Ridge Lake Animal Hospital

1400 Old Bridge Rd

Woodbridge, VA 22192

(703) 491-1111
In case of an after-hours emergency please contact the following emergency hospital:

Prince William Emergency Vet Clinic/Veterinary Referral Center
8610 Centreville Rd
Manassas, VA 20110
Phone: (703) 361-8287
http://vrc-nova.com/emergency

Regional Veterinary Referral Center (Emergency Department)
Backlick Shopping Center
6651 Backlick Rd
Springfield, VA 22150
Phone: (703) 451-8900
http://www.vetreferralcenter.com
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H3N2 Canine Influenza Alert

June 28, 2017


H3N2 Canine Influenza Alert



To Our Valued Clients:

Recently there has been a marked increase in the number of cases of canine H3N2 flu diagnosed in Florida. Canine flu is a HIGHLY contagious virus that spreads rapidly and can lead to serious complications if your dog is unvaccinated or not current on vaccines. Dogs most at risk are those that visit:- doggie daycare, dog parks, training classes, boarding facilities, dog friendly events, dog shows or sporting events or greet other dogs during walks.

Signs of CIV (Canine Influenza Virus) are:


        • Coughing





            • Discharge from eyes or nose





                • Loss of appetite





                    • Lethargy



                  If your dog was vaccinated in 2017 and has received BOTH the initial vaccine and the booster, they are protected. Any ADULT dog who received the initial vaccine in 2017 but not the booster, should come in and get the 2nd vaccine. Any dog vaccinated prior to 2017, needs to be updated.

                  We will not be charging an Office Visit charge for a Flu vaccine ONLY visit. Summer is almost upon us and we want to help keep your pet safe and give you peace of mind to continue your travel plans and outdoor activities.

                  If you’d like more information about canine influenza, please call our office.


                  Sincerely,
                  The Doctors at Ridge Lake Animal Hospital

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                  Ticks

                  May 17, 2017

                  By Dr. Rhonda Pierce

                  One of my favorite things about spring and summer is good weather to be outside walking and hiking with my dog Titan. Not that we don’t hike year round, but it’s easy to get out when it’s sunny and warm. But, there is definitely one part of being outside that I do not enjoy that spring brings along with it every year…..TICKS!!!

                  Recently Titan and I were outside just walking around the neighborhood; not even in the woods or high weeds. We came home and started our daily “tick check” after being outside and unbelievably found 6 ticks between the two of us! What was even more shocking was that Titan had 3 different species of ticks on him.

                  As a veterinarian, I commonly discuss ticks and tick borne illnesses in the exam room. But, I am writing this to just keep the threat of tick borne illnesses in the forefront of our minds because it can be truly devastating for not only our pets but for us as well.
                  The three tick species that Titan picked up in my Manassas neighborhood were the Lone Star tick; the Black Legged tick and the American Dog tick. I only had one tick on me and it was a Lone Star tick.

                  Virginia has three species of ticks and we encountered and brought home all 3 of them in one 45 minute walk around my neighborhood! My dog Titan is on monthly preventative ticks products and has a current Lyme vaccine but I had not taken any precautions for me on my short neighborhood walk.

                  Today, I am writing to give an overview of the three tick species that hitchhiked home with Titan and I. If you do not know how to identify the three tick species that are common in our area please check out the website from the Virginia Department of Health: www.vdh.virginia.gov/tickbrochure.

                  Adult_deer_tick

                  First, I will start with the Black Legged tick because it causes more disease in humans and dogs in the United States than any other tick. The Black-legged tick (also known more commonly as the deer tick) can carry a bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi. This is the only tick in the Eastern United States that can carry the Lyme bacteria. The nymph and adult ticks can transmit this disease to dogs and humans and need to feed for about 36 hours to transmit the disease. Most dogs who are infected with Lyme disease do not develop clinical signs but are infected subclinically without outward signs of the disease. Those dogs who do develop clinical signs will likely have lameness; lethargy and sometimes a fever and sometimes these signs can occur long after the tick bite. Less commonly, some dogs will develop life threatening kidney disease. The Black Legged tick can also transmit the bacteria Anaplasma phagocytophilum causing many clinical signs and a parasite called Babesiosis that infects red blood cells; both in humans and dogs.

                  Amblyomma_americanum_tick_2

                  The second tick I removed from both Titan and myself and is quickly becoming a problem around the United States for dogs and humans. This is the Lone Star tick. The Lone Star tick should strike fear into any human but especially any red meat loving human-because it can cause a severe red meat allergy in some people (and this Iowa born and raised girl buys her beef by the cow). That being said let’s look at the most common diseases carried by these originally Southwestern United States ticks (they now are one of Virginia’s most common ticks). The Lone Star tick can transmit several bacterial species of Ehrlichia causing Ehrlichiosis in humans and dogs. Tick transmission of Ehrlichiosis takes about 24 hours of feeding for the tick. Ehrlichiosis can cause a variety of symptoms in humans and dogs ranging from very mild fever and lethargy to even death in severe cases. The Lone Star tick can transmit other diseases such as Tularemia and Babesiosis but neither of these are common in Virginia.

                  Dermacentor_variabilis,_U,_Back,_MD,_Beltsville_2013-07-08-19.15.11_ZS_PMax

                  The third tick I removed from just Titan was the American Dog Tick. This tick can cause Rocky Mounted Spotted Fever (RMSF) in dogs and humans. RMSF is caused by an infection with the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii. The initial symptoms can be very general just like Ehrlichiosis or Anaplasmosis, but if left untreated up to 25% of these cases can be fatal. It is thought that the American dog tick only needs to feed about 10-20 hours to transmit the bacteria; but studies are showing that very few of the American Dog Ticks carry the bacteria that causes RMSF. That being said, tick prevention is vital because this disease can be deadly to us and our beloved dogs.

                  CaptureSo who needs tick prevention???? All of us. Any dog who goes outside needs tick prevention and possibly lyme vaccination. There currently is not a lyme vaccine for humans, but as soon as a safe vaccine is developed I plan on getting it. Our dogs should be tested at least annually to evaluate their tick exposure and potentially to treat them if they are infected. Currently I am treating Titan with a monthly flea/tick preventative called NexGard which is a chewable treat that he loves. But, there are a lot of other options out there from topicals to a new collar called Seresto that are very safe. For us humans, I think wearing proper clothing, checking for ticks and using products containing DEET if you are hiking. You can do your tick check and shower off that DEET once you get home.

                  A couple of last notes. I didn’t talk about cats today but here is a small bit of information about them. Outdoor cats in Virginia can be affected by tick diseases; usually Cytauxzoon felis; causing a disease known as Bobcat fever. The American Dog Tick and Lone Star Tick can carry this parasite. Unfortunately, this disease kills 25-40% of infected cats. This is a devastating disease that I have yet to diagnose but will likely see in the near future.

                  If you are not using regular tick preventatives in your dogs or indoor/outdoor kitties (remember even song birds and squirrels can harbor ticks-they are truly everywhere) then talk to one of our veterinary team. We have great, safe preventatives and we will be very happy to work with your family to determine which would be best for your furry baby.

                  Dr. Rhonda Pierce
                  Dr. Rhonda Pierce

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                  Pet Obesity

                  March 9, 2016
                  Did you know that obesity is not just an epidemic in humans but also in pets? According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), over 57% of dogs and 52% of cats are obese and these numbers are on the rise. Much like humans, obesity in pets can lead to diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, joint problems, and ultimately a shortened life expectancy. Based on a survey created by APOP, a surprising 93% of dog owners and 88% of cat owners thought their pet was in the normal weight range. This disparity is known as the “fat gap” and is thought to be one of the primary factors in the growing rate of pet obesity. To tell if your pet is a healthy weight, use this scoring system. Your pet should rank at about a 3 if he or she is a healthy weight. To keep your pet at a healthy weight, take care in providing him or her with a healthy diet and ensuring the proper amount of exercise. Pet foods have become more calorically dense and people are feeding their pets more. If your pet is already overweight or obese, talk to your veterinarian about the best course of action. Your vet will probably recommend a controlled diet and specific type of food. It can be hard to know what the proper caloric intake and weight should be for your pet so APOP has provided a few useful tables to help. This information does not replace the advice of your veterinarian and should only be used as a starting point. Pet Caloric Needs – http://www.petobesityprevention.org/pet-caloric-needs/ Ideal Weight Ranges – http://www.petobesityprevention.org/ideal-weight-ranges/

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                  Foods to Avoid Giving Your Dog

                  January 18, 2016
                  September is National Food Safety Month. Like cats and humans, certain foods can be toxic to dogs. While cats and dogs share many food toxicities, here is dog-specific and alphabetic list of the foods you should avoid giving your dog. Alcohol: Dogs are far more sensitive to alcohol than humans are. Just a little bit can cause vomiting, diarrhea, central nervous system depression, coordination problems, difficulty breathing, coma, and even death. Hops in particular, which is found in beer, has been found to poison dogs. Dogs affected by hops can have damage and failure to multiple organ systems due to an uncontrollably high body temperature. Avocado: Persin, the toxic element in Avocado, can cause mild upset stomach. Persin can be found in the leaves, seed, bark, and inside the fruit. Avocado is sometimes included in pet food but does not pose a threat to dogs. Chocolate: Unlike cats, dogs will eat chocolate on their own. The rule with chocolate is usually, “the darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is.” White chocolate contains very few methylxanthines, the toxic component of chocolate, while dark baker’s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and quantity of the chocolate consumed, the reaction your dog may have can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort, and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures, and death. Coffee/Caffeine: Caffeine in large enough quantities can be fatal for a dog and there is no antidote. Symptoms of caffeine poisoning include restlessness, rapid breathing, heart palpitations, muscle tremors, and bleeding. Corncobs: Corncobs are not digestible and often cause obstructions in the intestines. Fat Trimmings and Bones: Don’t feed your dog table scraps. Fat, when cooked or uncooked, can cause pancreatitis (inflamed pancreas). Bones should not be given to dogs either, as they can choke on it or the bone may splinter and cause an obstruction or internal lacerations. Grapes and Raisins: Although it is not known what makes grapes and raisins toxic, they have been associated with kidney failure in dogs. Some dogs eat them without any effects while others can develop vomiting, lethargy, diarrhea, and kidney failure. Kidney failure means your dog’s ability to product urine decreases so they are unable to filter toxins out of their system. Macadamia nuts: Although the chance that macadamia nuts are deathly to dogs is low, the symptoms they do feel can be very uncomfortable. Symptoms can include muscle tremors, paralysis of the back legs, vomiting, and more. Milk/Dairy Products: Because dogs are devoid of the lactase needed to breakdown milk, milk and milk-based products can cause diarrhea and an upset stomach. Mushrooms: Some types of mushrooms contain toxins that can affect multiple systems in the body that result in nervous system abnormalities, seizures, shock, or death. Onions, Garlic, and Chives: All members, and close members of the onion family (including shallots, garlic, scallions, etc.), can cause damage to a dog’s red blood cells, leading to anemia. Like chocolate, the stronger it is, the more toxic it is. Garlic has been found to be more toxic to dogs than onions. Even dehydrated forms of garlic and onion are a threat to your dog’s health. Affected dogs may exhibit symptoms up to five days later and can include weakness, reluctance to move, and orange-tinted to dark red urine. Dogs that have ingested garlic or onion should be examined by a veterinarian immediately. Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums: The seeds or pits from these fruits are the main concern. Persimmons seeds can cause inflammation of the small intestines or intestinal obstruction. Intestinal obstruction is also a concern for peach and plum pits. Peach and plum pits also contain cyanide which is poisonous to both dogs and humans. Humans just know not to eat them. Raw eggs, meat, and fish: Raw eggs, meat, and fish can contain bacteria like salmonella that can lead to food poisoning. Raw eggs also interfere with the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin) and can lead to skin, hair, and coat issues. Certain fish can cause “fish disease” which can be fatal within the first two weeks. The first signs are vomiting, fever, and swollen lymph nodes. Thoroughly cooking meat and fish will kill the parasites and protect your dog. Salt: Giving your dog salty foods is not a good idea. Eating too much salt can cause excessive thirst and urination which leads to sodium ion poisoning. Symptoms of excessive salt consumption can include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, elevated body temperature, seizures, and even death. Sugary foods: Sugary foods, such as candy and gum, are usually sweetened with xylitol. Xylitol is known for increasing insulin production which causes blood sugar levels to drop. It can also cause disorientation and seizures as fast as 30 minutes after ingestion or as delayed as several hours. Xylitol can also lead to liver failure in just a few days. Even if the sugary food doesn’t contain xylitol it can still lead to obesity, dental problems, and diabetes. Yeast dough: Yeast dough can expand and produce gas in the digestive system. This can lead to pain and a possible rupture of the stomach or intestines. Additionally, when the yeast causes the dough to rise, it produces alcohol that can lead to alcohol poisoning. Dogs with extreme poisoning cases can go into a coma or have seizures. Non-food items: Foreign objects such as toys, small items of clothing, and medicine are perhaps a greater risk to dogs than food. One case is medical marijuana. It comes in many forms that a pet can easily eat and can cause vomiting, changes in heart rate, and depress the nervous system. If you suspect your dog ate any of these foods, first try to determine what and how much he or she ate. You should then call us or your veterinarian to see if medical attention is needed. If a veterinarian is not available, call either Animal Poison Control at 888-426-4435 or the Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680. Do you have a cat? Most foods that are toxic for dogs are also toxic for cats. Check out this blog post for a cat-specific list of toxic foods. If you’re unsure about a certain food for either your cat or your dog and it’s not on this list, call your veterinarian. Your pet’s health is worth the call!

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                  Foods to Avoid Giving Your Cat

                  January 4, 2016
                  September is National Food Safety Month. Just like people can’t eat everything they come across, cats can’t either. In fact, many human foods are toxic for cats. See the alphabetic list below for the foods you should avoid giving your cat. Alcohol: Alcohol has the same effect on a cat’s brain and liver as it does to humans but it takes far less to see the effects. As little as a teaspoon can cause a coma in a cat and it can easily cause severe liver or brain damage. The higher the proof of alcohol, the worse the symptoms will be. Chocolate: Although most cats won’t eat chocolate on their own, you should not attempt to try to feed it to your cat. Chocolate contains theobromine, a chemical found in all chocolate including white chocolate, which is toxic to cats. Eating chocolate can cause abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures, and even death. Dark and semisweet chocolate are the most dangerous. Coffee/Caffeine: Along with chocolate, coffee contains caffeine. This can cause vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors, and can be toxic to the heart and nervous system. Fat Trimmings and Bones: Don’t feed your cat table scraps. Fat, when cooked or uncooked, can cause intestinal problems, vomiting, diarrhea, or pancreatitis (inflamed pancreas). Cats can choke on bones or the bones can splinter and cause an obstruction or internal lacerations. You should also never give them anything that is as hard as or harder than their teeth because it can cause dental fractures. Fish: This includes raw, canned, and cooked fish. You can get away with small amounts of fish but if fed in high amounts your cat can develop a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency that leads to loss of appetite, seizures, and maybe death. The exception to this is if the fish is made into cat food. Most good cat food brands are supplemented with thiamine are just fine. Grapes and Raisins: Although it is not known what makes grapes and raisins toxic, they can cause kidney failure. Even a small amount can make a cat sick and cause them to repeatedly vomit and be hyperactive. Macadamia nuts: Like grapes and raisins, it is not known what makes macadamia nuts toxic. Ingestion of macadamia nuts can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle. Milk/Dairy Products: Surprisingly most cats are lactose-intolerant, so it’s best to be safe and avoid any dairy products. Mushrooms: Some types of mushrooms contain toxins that can affect multiple systems in the body and cause shock or result in death. Onions, Garlic, and Chives: Onion, in any form, can cause a cat to become anemic because it breaks down red blood cells. Even the onion powder that is in some baby foods is bad for cats. Onion, along with garlic and chives, can also cause gastrointestinal upset. Raw eggs and meat: Raw eggs contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin) and can lead to skin, hair, and coat issues. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella or other parasites. Raw meat may contain Salmonella and E. coli which can cause diarrhea and vomiting. Sugary foods: Sugary foods, such as candy and gum, are usually sweetened with xylitol. Xylitol is known for increasing insulin production which causes blood sugar levels to drop. It can also cause vomiting, fatigue, loss of coordination, and eventually liver failure. Even if the sugary food doesn’t contain xylitol it can still lead to obesity, dental problems, and diabetes. Yeast dough: Yeast dough can expand and produce gas in the digestive system. This can lead to pain and a possible rupture of the stomach or intestines. Additionally, when the yeast causes the dough to rise, it produces alcohol that can lead to alcohol poisoning. Non-food items: Foreign objects such as toys, soft rubber objects, stringy objects (thread, yarn, tinsel), coins, and medicine are perhaps a greater risk to cats than food. Aspirin, Tylenol, and Motrin are all highly toxic and a single tablet could be lethal.   If you suspect your cat ate any of these foods, first try to determine what and how much he or she ate. You should then call us or your veterinarian to see if medical attention is needed. If a veterinarian is not available, call either Animal Poison Control at 888-426-4435 or the Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680. Do you have a dog? Most foods that are toxic for cats are also toxic for dogs. Check back here later for a dog-specific list of toxic foods. If you’re unsure about a certain food and it’s not on this list, call your veterinarian. Your pet’s health is worth the call!

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                  How to Train Your Dog

                  November 24, 2015
                  Sit. Stay. Now read. Training your dog can take a lot of time and sometimes it even seems like you’re not making any progress. But what if that’s because you’re not doing it in the best way possible? Dogs thrive from positive reinforcement. That is, if they do something right or well, they will get rewarded. Positive reinforcement can be the tone of your voice, a toy, or an edible treat. Negative reinforcement should never include hitting. Following some of the simple training guidelines listed here can make all the difference. 1. Make sure your whole family is doing the same training techniques. If you use the command “stay” and someone else uses “wait,” you won’t get the results you’re looking for. You should also make sure that you are all rewarding your dog for the same behaviors. 2. Make the commands simple and short. Try to keep your commands to one or two words. Sit, stay, come, here, down, lie down, etc. 3. If your pet does something right, reward him or her immediately. If you wait, they may not associate the reward with the action. 4. Make sure to reward your dog with something he or she will enjoy. Food treats tend to work especially well but other positive reinforcements can include praise, petting, or a favorite toy or game. 5. As your dog begins to learn the command, slowly ease up on how often he or she is rewarded. Go from continuous reinforcements to only intermittent reinforcements. You should get to the point where you are only giving a reward for the behavior occasionally. All dogs are different so it is important to remain patient and consistent with your training. Your family should spend some time every day reinforcing the good behaviors. You can find a program led by an accredited instructor but the real work needs to be done at home. A trainer trains the family while the family trains a pet. Happy training and good luck! Wyomissing Animal Hospital has provided superior veterinary care for small animals for more than twenty years. Founded by Dr. Boyd Wagner and Dr. John Hampson, the hospital now has eight doctors and over 50 staff members who are dedicated to providing professional and loving care to all of our patients. At Wyomissing Animal Hospital, we understand that your pets are your family. We provide both wellness care and medical treatment for your animals. Wyomissing Animal Hospital is accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. AAHA accreditation recognizes our hospital’s commitment to meeting the highest quality standards of care – a recognition achieved by only 17% of small animal practices in the United States and Canada.

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                  How to Check Your Pet for Ticks

                  October 7, 2015
                  I went for a walk with my pet. Now what? The warm summer months means spending more time outside and unfortunately, ticks. Many ticks are co-infected, meaning that they carry more than one disease, including Lyme disease. Did you know that only about 5% of dogs exposed will develop symptoms that are attributed to Lyme disease? But with all this said, you’re still going to go for walks with your dog and your outdoor cat will still want to be outdoors. You can prevent Lyme disease by making sure you thoroughly check your pet’s body after they’ve been outside and removing ticks before they attach themselves. Even if your dog or cat wears a tick and/or flea preventative collar or is given a spot-on medication, it is a good idea to do a quick body check. Keeping your pet’s fur short is an easy first step. Breeds with shorter hair are easier to check than those with long hair. Shorter coats make the ticks easier to see by keeping them close to the surface while longer hair allows a tick to hide deep in the fur and avoid being discovered for long periods of time. Brush or run your hands over your pet’s whole body, applying enough pressure to feel any small bumps or something the size of a pea. You may also use a brush or flea comb, stopping if you hit a bump or a snag to investigate. Most attachments occur in front of the shoulder blades, which includes the head, neck, and front legs. Make sure to also feel under the collar, under their armpits, between their toes, behind the ears, and around the tail. Ticks are attracted to dark, hidden areas and when attached can range in size from the size of a pinhead to a grape. If you find an unattached tick, place it in alcohol and dispose of it. Flushing a tick down the toilet will not kill it. If the tick is embedded, you must remove it carefully so you extract the whole tick. If you are uncomfortable removing the tick yourself then call your vet. While wearing gloves to protect yourself, use fine-tipped tweezers to grip the tick’s head as close to the skin as possible. Pull the tick straight out, slowly and steadily, without squeezing the body. After removing the tick, place it in alcohol and clean the bitten area with soap and warm water. Keep an eye on the bitten area to see if an infection arises or if your pet starts to act abnormally. It is very typical for a small nodule to occur at the site of the attachment and persist for up to three weeks. Signs of Lyme disease typically occur one to three weeks following a bite and may include limping, poor appetite, and fever. A very small percentage of dogs may also develop a fatal form that affects their kidneys. If the skin remains irritated or infected or you suspect something might be wrong, call us at 610-372-2121.

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                  Safety Tips for Bringing Your Dog to the Beach

                  September 11, 2015
                  Besides the ocean, there are many other dangers that your dog can encounter at the beach. Being alert and attentive and following some of these rules will make your beach getaway proceed without problems! First, make sure to adhere to the beach’s specific rules as these are actually laws and you can be given a citation or fine. Some common laws include cleaning up after your dog, requiring your dog to wear a collar and ID tags and be up-to-date on vaccinations, be on a leash, and so on. Make sure to check prior to leaving to see if your beach destination is pet friendly! Just like people, dogs can only handle so much sun. Sunscreen that is safe for your dog is available at pet stores or online. Do not use a sunscreen unless it is specifically labeled safe for animal use. Make sure there is a shady spot for your dog to retreat to like an umbrella, picnic table, or tree and bring plenty of fresh, cool water and a dog bowl. Offer water refills often, making sure that the water does not get hot in the sun. Watch for signs of overheating, which can include: excessive panting or drooling, vomiting or diarrhea, collapse, and loss of consciousness. If you start to see any of these signs immediately move your dog to a cooler environment. While staying calm and speaking in a soothing voice, wrap the dog in cool, wet towels. A fan can be used to help blow air over the animal to speed up the cooling and applying isopropyl alcohol to the paw pads will facilitate cooling and should be repeated as the alcohol dries. It is important to never fully immerse your overheated pet in water as it may increase their anxiety. Hot sand is also a very real concern. Foot pad burns can occur when the sand is too hot. If a person cannot walk barefoot, their dog cannot either. While on the sand, lead the way for your dog to make sure they won’t step on anything sharp. Broken glass and shells are only two of many things that can hurt your pet’s paws. If your dog’s paw gets cut, apply pressure to the wound to ease the bleeding. If it’s severe, seek veterinary attention immediately. Once in the water, jellyfish and rocks start to potentially pose problems. If your dog gets stung by a jellyfish, douse the affected area in vinegar to ease the pain and kill off the stinging barbs before trying to remove the tentacles. If your dog does not come to you every time you call them, keep them on a leash. You can buy a long-reaching leash (20-30 feet) which will still allow you and your dog to play with a ball or Frisbee without worrying about the possibility of them running away. Pay close attention to your dog’s swimming habits. Fitness level, experience, and even breed of dog can influence how well your dog can swim. Poor swimmers and brachycephalic breeds like Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, and Boxers should probably not spend much time on the beach. When in doubt, put a life vest on your dog and keep an eye out. If your pet does go in the water, make sure to remove them if they start to drink the water. Instead offer fresh, clean water since salt water is bad for dogs and can cause gastrointestinal problems. Salt water may also cause some irritation to their skin and paws. Rinsing your dog off with fresh water before you leave or shortly after getting home will help him or her stay comfortable and happy. Lastly, and maybe most importantly, have fun!

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                  BBQ, Pets, and Guests

                  August 23, 2015
                  Summer is officially here! It’s a great time for outdoor fun and BBQing or grilling with your pets, friends, and family. While you may know what your pet can and cannot have, it is important to share this information with others. Don’t assume that your friends know what foods are toxic to pets. Several foods to avoid include fatty sausages (pancreatitis), chocolate from s’mores (chocolate toxicity), and wild mushrooms (mushroom toxicity can prove fatal to certain dog breeds). While the list can be very extensive, we encourage you to have a brief conversation with your friends. They will appreciate it and so will your pets!

                  Dogs and Thunderstorms

                  July 31, 2015
                  You probably heard it repeatedly right around the Fourth of July in relation to fireworks—leave your pets at home. But the reason extends to more than just fireworks. Many dogs are frightened by loud noises and almost all aspects of a thunderstorm: wind, rain, thunder, lightning, and even atmospheric pressure. These fears can develop even if your dog has not had any traumatic experiences. The level of anxiety your dog experiences depends on the individual dog. Some dogs whine and pace while others injure themselves trying to escape. The most common reactions to loud noises are destruction and running away or escaping. To reduce his fears, your dog might seek out a place where the thunder or loud sounds are less intense. You can try a few different things to ease his fears. First is to create a “safe place” or somewhere that is safe for your dog to be and is readily accessible. Let him choose this place by seeing where he goes during a storm and making this a space he can retreat to when he is scared. Another option is to distract your dog. This works best when your dog is just beginning to get anxious. Engage your dog in an activity he likes that will capture his attention and distract him from the noises. This can mean a game of fetch, practicing behavioral commands, or even listening to calm music. While it may seem counter-intuitive, do not attempt to reassure or soothe your dog too much when he is afraid. This includes over petting and giving him treats. Attempting to do so may reinforce the fearful behavior and make it worse. You should, instead, stay calm and as relaxed as possible. Another interesting option is a snug-fitting garment or shirt, such as the ThunderShirt. Products like this apply gentle, constant pressure and are designed to calm anxious dogs. They have a calming effect similar to swaddling a baby. If you prefer to make your own, you can buy a small t-shirt and put your dog’s front legs through the armholes of the shirt. The shirt should fit snugly around your dog’s torso. You can also try behavior modification. Counterconditioning is when the animal is taught to display acceptable behavior instead of the unacceptable one. You can do this by only playing your dog’s favorite game or giving him his favorite toy right before and during a storm. Another modification is desensitization. This is when your dog’s response is decreased while exposed to increasing levels of what they’re afraid of. For a noise phobia, start with the noise at a quiet level and work your way to a louder volume level. If you feel that his anxiety is out of control, consult your veterinarian as medication can be prescribed to temporarily alleviate your dog’s anxiety. Do not give your dog any over the counter or prescription medication without asking your vet first. What works for a human may be fatal to your dog. If you have any concerns or questions, please give us a call at 610-372-2121.   Wyomissing Animal Hospital has provided superior veterinary care for small animals for more than twenty years. Founded by Dr. Boyd Wagner and Dr. John Hampson, the hospital now has eight doctors and over 50 staff members who are dedicated to providing professional and loving care to all of our patients. At Wyomissing Animal Hospital, we understand that your pets are your family. We provide both wellness care and medical treatment for your animals. Wyomissing Animal Hospital is accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. AAHA accreditation recognizes our hospital’s commitment to meeting the highest quality standards of care – a recognition achieved by only 17% of small animal practices in the United States and Canada.

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